Numeracy

"Numeracy is a proficiency that involves confidence and competence with numbers and measures. It requires an understanding of the number system, a repertoire of computational skills and an inclination and ability to solve number problems in a variety of contexts. Numeracy also demands practical understanding of the ways in which information is gathered by counting and measuring, and is presented in graphs, diagrams, charts and tables."

National Framework for teaching Mathematics


Mathematical skills can be consolidated and enhanced when students have opportunities to apply and develop them across the curriculum. Numeracy is a key skill in students' learning and all students are entitled to quality experiences in this area. The teaching of numeracy is the responsibility of all staff.  Curriculum areas will endeavour to ensure that materials presented to students will match their capability both in subject content and in numerical demands. They will liaise with the Mathematics department when appropriate in order to support their teaching of numeracy.

All teachers should consider students' ability to cope with the numerical demands of everyday life and provide opportunities for students to:

  • Interpret data, charts and diagrams
  • Process information
  • Solve problems
  • Check answers
  • Understand and explain solutions
  • Make decisions based on logical thinking and reasoning.

Useful Information for Parents

Support and encourage the development of your child’s Numeracy.

Support the school in the implementation of whole school expectations of numeracy skills in order to maximise the potential of your child and therefore all learners.

Familiarise yourselves with the Numeracy skills expected of your child and support the learning of your child at home.

On Fronter we have a range of resources available for your child across all key stages such as links to various external websites; videos to help support your child; the textbooks used in school; past exam question and various other documents.

Some external useful websites to support numeracy are:

  • BBC Skillwise  www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/maths aimed at: key stages 3 and 4, a fantastic website from the BBC which is aimed at bringing you up to speed with all the key kills that students need to succeed at maths today.
  • Nrich www.nrich.maths.org aimed at all key stages. If your child can do a few puzzles a week off this site, it will do them a lot more good than reading over the textbook again and again ever will. These puzzles teach children how to think and solve problems for themselves, which are essential skills for success at maths and all subjects. Each puzzle comes complete with a worked answer and details of the thought processes involved.
  • Maths Mistakes www.mathsmistakes.org aimed at all key stages. Lots of mistakes made by real students, which can form the basis of a useful discussion of a topic, and hopefully ensure your child does not make the same mistakes.

Useful Information for Students

Use your exercise book whenever necessary to support your strategies when solving a problem, or to make notes of a problem that you need further assistance with.

Attempt to use key words learnt in mathematics lessons to support your learning in other subjects.

Encourage parental involvement by sharing the work done daily in school and emphasising where numerical skills have been used.

 

Latest News

Posted on: 4/02/2019

The Hidden World of the Atom

Last November, A Level Physics students from Hatch End High went to a lecture at the University College London. There, Dr. Robert Palgrave delivered a mesmerizing lecture on the Hidden World of Atoms. Dr Palgrave started the lecture by introducing the great Michael Faraday’s example of a burning candle flame to explain modern chemistry. That seemingly modest reaction is summarized here: CnH(2n+2) (s) + {(3n+1)/2}O2 (g) → n CO2 (g) + (n+1)H2O (g) Many of the students in the auditorium that evening were wondering, how do we know that atoms are structured and behave in the way we see them in textbooks? The lecture took us on a history tour starting as early as antiquity. Democritus, the ancient Greek philosopher, considered the fundamental question on the nature of matter. He imagined a very large block of gold, which he cut it into half repeatedly. The question he posed was: “Is there ever a point where the block of gold can’t be cut any further?”. The people who thought the block could not be divided were called atomists and thus, they called the smallest unit of matter “the atom” (Greek: a + tomos = not cut). On the other hand, those who disagreed with Democritus could not accept the fact that there were gaps between atoms, which contained nothing. Dr Palgrave then steered us into the 1880s, an era of rampant discovery in chemistry. Joseph Priestly discovered oxygen and nitrous oxide (commonly known as laughing gas). His contemporary and equal, Henry Cavendish would discover hydrogen in this period, calling it “inflammable air”. Astutely, Cavendish realized that no matter the amount of product made, the reactants always reacted in a certain proportion with each other. John Dalton (shown) lay down the foundations for modern atomic theory – his postulates said the states of matter (solids, liquids, and gases) are composed of discrete, indivisible units called atoms. Elements (like Cavendish’s hydrogen) are composed of atoms of the same mass and properties, and chemical reactions simply are the rearrangement of these atoms. Dr Palgrave then entertained us with the story of August Kekule, a German organic chemist, who was the first person to solve the structure of benzene - a problem which had been troubling chemists for decades. The legend goes that whilst Kekule was asleep in front of the fire, he had a dream of a snake devouring its own tail. Upon waking, Kekule had the idea of the circular structure of benzene (shown). As Dr Pelgrave brought his lecture to a close, he arrived at his conclusion. The truth about the hidden world of atoms becomes clear: the accuracy and usefulness of scientific models of atoms have improved over time. Science is the relentless and rigourous pursuit of better and better models to explain the natural world. Written by Monishka Sinha(6HME).
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